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Posts published in “Business & Markets”

The High Cost of the Holidays during Covid

This year, it looks like there’ll be one uninvited guest at your house for the holidays: inflation. The coming holiday season will be one of the most expensive on record given the rising costs of food (a 5.3% gain since last year) and a higher Consumer Price Index (a 6.2% rise since last year). The CPI reached a 30-year high in October, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Rising inflation might cause the Federal Reserve to continue its policy course. However, according to experts, these bumps are all very normal as the economy gets back up and running. 

Supply chain issues continue to be a problem as well.…

The Boost to the Covid Vax

The air is brisk, the days are shorter, and the temperature is dropping, which can only mean one thing: It’s respiratory virus season. Or at least it’s a notable season for us health care workers, especially those of us who work in pediatrics. Respiratory viruses increase in prevalence during the winter months. This is because viruses can survive longer in colder temperatures and lower humidity and because people spend more time inside during the winter. But I’m not here to remind you of elementary science. I’m here to talk about the science behind the Covid vaccine and some of the uncertainties.…

What Is a Semiconductor and Why Should You Care?

Being in business school, or at least being someone who reads a business school newspaper, you know how important semiconductors are in the modern economy. You know that they are a critical component for everything that uses electronic chips to operate (which is everything) and that the largest nations like the U.S. and China see the semiconductor supply chain as critical to operating their economies and to maintaining national security. It recently occurred to me though that I didn’t know what a semiconductor actually is. Call me a stickler for details, but I think it is important to know what a thing is when that thing affects hundreds of billions of dollars every year and receives a high level of scrutiny from every major government.…

The EV revolution: can Biden take us the last mile?

By Nicolaus Schmandt

113 years after Henry Ford’s first Model T rolled off the assembly line in Michigan, combustion engines remain the dominant means of moving a vehicle. For technology to last more than a century is an impressive run. Compared to phones, computers, and personal electronics, multiple iterations of which are unrecognizable and unusably primitive today, cars have remained surprisingly consistent. 

But, finally, the end seems to be coming with Ford planning to put its last gasoline engine in a car in 2034, after which all vehicles produced by Ford will be electric. That’s around the time several governments, including California and most of Europe, are saying they will ban the sale of gas vehicles.…

Getting our vax on

These past few months, we have seen the U.S. do a “boot and rally” on Covid. After doing a terrible job of early testing and surveillance, vaccine rollout has gone remarkably well. In the past three months, an average of two million vaccines have been administered a day. Our population is currently 35% fully vaccinated and 46% partially vaccinated as of May 12. However, we are now getting to the point where the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine supply is starting to surpass demand, thanks to the “vaccine hesitancy” phenomenon. 

Hesitancy is firmest in Republican white communities in rural areas and is often clouded in misinformation.…

SHA Solidarity Week: The Impact of COVID-19 on Marginalized Communities

On April 8, the Stern Healthcare Association had the good fortune of hosting Dr. Joseph Ravenell, the Associate Dean of Diversity Affairs and Inclusion at NYU Langone Health. Dr. Ravenell led a discussion on how this pandemic has hit lower socioeconomic neighborhoods with a higher disease burden and mortality rate than more privileged neighborhoods.

Racism has been with us for centuries, and long-standing social disparities go back throughout the history of the U.S. Any group seen as different from the dominant group in this country has often been seen as a threat and discriminated against. This was made more evident during the pandemic, which can be seen both from health outcomes and the social unrest arising from blatant systemic racism. …

Coronavirus and the Market Part IV: Jerome Powell -The Hero We Needed

In the last article from this series in June 2020, I spoke about the impending doom of rising interest rates. I mentioned how this would be precipitated by additional federal government stimulus legislation and the need for the U.S. Treasury to issue more debt to fund so much new federal spending. For once I was right. The yield curve did steepen back in June. Specifically, most of the steepening occurred primarily on the 20-year point due to the new treasury issuance with that same maturity, the rest of the curve was relatively unchanged from the 0-10-year points. As a quick refresher, since the yield curve represents expected future interest rates, it also indicates growth expectations for the general economy. …

Reflecting on this past year and the latest on the “Fauci Ouchie”

This week marks the one-year anniversary of March 11, 2020, when Covid-19 was officially upgraded from an epidemic to a pandemic by the World Health Organization. At that time, there were less than a 1000 known cases in the U.S. and infectious disease experts were still hopeful we could get the virus spread under control. It was the first time in a century a communicable disease was categorized a pandemic of this severity (and hopefully, the last for at least another century). I don’t need to go into all the minute details, because we have all lived through it, but it is important to remember that in a year we have lost over 500,000 Americans to Covid. …

The NYU Stern Fintech Conference Goes Virtual in 2021

On Friday March 5, NYU Stern’s Fubon Center for Technology, Business, and Innovation hosted Stern’s fourth annual Fintech Conference via a Virtual Zoom Webinar. The conference theme was “No Borders, No Barriers,” highlighting that technology has no passport. In line with that theme, the event featured an international slate of speakers from several countries, including the United States, Israel, India, Argentina, United Kingdom, California, and the Netherlands.

The conference was once again a smashing success with 1,200 registrants signing up for the virtual format, bringing together “top fintech scholars, forward-looking financial institutions, innovative fintech startups, and leading fintech investors” in the words of Kathleen DeRose, Director of the Fubon Fintech Initiative and Clinical Associate Professor of Finance at Stern. …

Covid Vax Facts

Since our last issue, I received not only one, but two of my Covid-19 vaccinations. Excuse, me as I flex… my vaccinated deltoid muscle that is.

I received the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, one of the two vaccines (the other being Moderna’s) approved for emergency use by the FDA in the US. Both Moderna and Pfizer use mRNA technology that consists of re-engineered messenger RNA (mRNA). mRNA are molecules that relay genetic instructions from DNA to ribosomes, the cell’s protein-making machinery. In this case, the vaccine mRNA gives our B-cells (a type of white blood cell) the genetic sequencing of SARS-CoV-2, and the B-cells then produce an immune response that generates antibodies.…

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