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Posts published in “Health”

Wellness & Busyness Part 2: Interview with Allyson Dhindsa, Career Coach at Stern

This interview is a follow-up to our Wellness & Busyness article from November, in which we received an overwhelming response from students regarding their tactics to balance life, work, and attaining MBAs in a society that tends to glorify “busyness.” Allyson Dhindsa is an associate director in the Office of Career Development at Stern. She coaches full-time MBA students 1:1 as well as in groups, on attaining internships and full-time roles, particularly those with non-traditional backgrounds. She looked over our raw data (anonymous still) from the survey and sat down with me to give her thoughts on busyness in business school, from the perspective of a career coach.…

The Boost to the Covid Vax

The air is brisk, the days are shorter, and the temperature is dropping, which can only mean one thing: It’s respiratory virus season. Or at least it’s a notable season for us health care workers, especially those of us who work in pediatrics. Respiratory viruses increase in prevalence during the winter months. This is because viruses can survive longer in colder temperatures and lower humidity and because people spend more time inside during the winter. But I’m not here to remind you of elementary science. I’m here to talk about the science behind the Covid vaccine and some of the uncertainties.…

Getting our vax on

These past few months, we have seen the U.S. do a “boot and rally” on Covid. After doing a terrible job of early testing and surveillance, vaccine rollout has gone remarkably well. In the past three months, an average of two million vaccines have been administered a day. Our population is currently 35% fully vaccinated and 46% partially vaccinated as of May 12. However, we are now getting to the point where the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine supply is starting to surpass demand, thanks to the “vaccine hesitancy” phenomenon. 

Hesitancy is firmest in Republican white communities in rural areas and is often clouded in misinformation.…

SHA Solidarity Week: The Impact of COVID-19 on Marginalized Communities

On April 8, the Stern Healthcare Association had the good fortune of hosting Dr. Joseph Ravenell, the Associate Dean of Diversity Affairs and Inclusion at NYU Langone Health. Dr. Ravenell led a discussion on how this pandemic has hit lower socioeconomic neighborhoods with a higher disease burden and mortality rate than more privileged neighborhoods.

Racism has been with us for centuries, and long-standing social disparities go back throughout the history of the U.S. Any group seen as different from the dominant group in this country has often been seen as a threat and discriminated against. This was made more evident during the pandemic, which can be seen both from health outcomes and the social unrest arising from blatant systemic racism. …

Reflecting on this past year and the latest on the “Fauci Ouchie”

This week marks the one-year anniversary of March 11, 2020, when Covid-19 was officially upgraded from an epidemic to a pandemic by the World Health Organization. At that time, there were less than a 1000 known cases in the U.S. and infectious disease experts were still hopeful we could get the virus spread under control. It was the first time in a century a communicable disease was categorized a pandemic of this severity (and hopefully, the last for at least another century). I don’t need to go into all the minute details, because we have all lived through it, but it is important to remember that in a year we have lost over 500,000 Americans to Covid. …

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