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Posts published in “Business & Markets”

The EV revolution: can Biden take us the last mile?

By Nicolaus Schmandt

113 years after Henry Ford’s first Model T rolled off the assembly line in Michigan, combustion engines remain the dominant means of moving a vehicle. For technology to last more than a century is an impressive run. Compared to phones, computers, and personal electronics, multiple iterations of which are unrecognizable and unusably primitive today, cars have remained surprisingly consistent. 

But, finally, the end seems to be coming with Ford planning to put its last gasoline engine in a car in 2034, after which all vehicles produced by Ford will be electric. That’s around the time several governments, including California and most of Europe, are saying they will ban the sale of gas vehicles.…

Getting our vax on

These past few months, we have seen the U.S. do a “boot and rally” on Covid. After doing a terrible job of early testing and surveillance, vaccine rollout has gone remarkably well. In the past three months, an average of two million vaccines have been administered a day. Our population is currently 35% fully vaccinated and 46% partially vaccinated as of May 12. However, we are now getting to the point where the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine supply is starting to surpass demand, thanks to the “vaccine hesitancy” phenomenon. 

Hesitancy is firmest in Republican white communities in rural areas and is often clouded in misinformation.…

SHA Solidarity Week: The Impact of COVID-19 on Marginalized Communities

On April 8, the Stern Healthcare Association had the good fortune of hosting Dr. Joseph Ravenell, the Associate Dean of Diversity Affairs and Inclusion at NYU Langone Health. Dr. Ravenell led a discussion on how this pandemic has hit lower socioeconomic neighborhoods with a higher disease burden and mortality rate than more privileged neighborhoods.

Racism has been with us for centuries, and long-standing social disparities go back throughout the history of the U.S. Any group seen as different from the dominant group in this country has often been seen as a threat and discriminated against. This was made more evident during the pandemic, which can be seen both from health outcomes and the social unrest arising from blatant systemic racism. …

Coronavirus and the Market Part IV: Jerome Powell -The Hero We Needed

In the last article from this series in June 2020, I spoke about the impending doom of rising interest rates. I mentioned how this would be precipitated by additional federal government stimulus legislation and the need for the U.S. Treasury to issue more debt to fund so much new federal spending. For once I was right. The yield curve did steepen back in June. Specifically, most of the steepening occurred primarily on the 20-year point due to the new treasury issuance with that same maturity, the rest of the curve was relatively unchanged from the 0-10-year points. As a quick refresher, since the yield curve represents expected future interest rates, it also indicates growth expectations for the general economy. …

Reflecting on this past year and the latest on the “Fauci Ouchie”

This week marks the one-year anniversary of March 11, 2020, when Covid-19 was officially upgraded from an epidemic to a pandemic by the World Health Organization. At that time, there were less than a 1000 known cases in the U.S. and infectious disease experts were still hopeful we could get the virus spread under control. It was the first time in a century a communicable disease was categorized a pandemic of this severity (and hopefully, the last for at least another century). I don’t need to go into all the minute details, because we have all lived through it, but it is important to remember that in a year we have lost over 500,000 Americans to Covid. …

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