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Posts published in “Allyship”

Solidarity Week: Asian Business Society held community conversation

As part of Stern’s Solidarity Week, The Oppy has partnered with the Asian Business Society (ABS) for a community conversation focused on the Asian and AAPI experience. Having covered many stories on AAPI issues as a journalist, I got to moderate the conversation with 5 student speakers, Jeremy Russell, Vivian Chen, Gordon Fan, Dat Hoang, and Laura Ding, who are all members of Stern’s AAPI community.

As more attacks on Asians have come to light, leaders at ABS felt it was paramount for this event to feel like an open discussion rather than a listening experience.

Stephanie Li, the incoming co-president of ABS, said she specifically wanted a panel of student speakers instead of an expert or celebrity.…

NYU Stern Solidarity Week Event – What is Environmental Racism?

By William O’Leary

Cancer Alley, Louisiana. The Flint water crisis. The Exide Technologies plant in Los Angeles. Chevron’s destruction of the Ecuadorian Amazon and subsequent exploitation of the global economic and legal system to avoid justice. These are just a few of the notable examples of environmental racism inflicted on low-income Black, brown, and indigenous communities by businesses and governments. On Tuesday, April 6th, NYU Stern’s Social Impact and Sustainability Association (SISA) and the Association of Hispanic and Black Business Students (AHBBS) co-hosted an event titled, “What is Environmental Racism?”, where NYU Liberal Studies professor Leo Douglas noted that we will have achieved environmental justice only when “everyone enjoys the same degree of protection from environmental and health hazards, and equal access to the decision-making process to have a healthy environment in which to live, learn, and work.”…

SHA Solidarity Week: The Impact of COVID-19 on Marginalized Communities

On April 8, the Stern Healthcare Association had the good fortune of hosting Dr. Joseph Ravenell, the Associate Dean of Diversity Affairs and Inclusion at NYU Langone Health. Dr. Ravenell led a discussion on how this pandemic has hit lower socioeconomic neighborhoods with a higher disease burden and mortality rate than more privileged neighborhoods.

Racism has been with us for centuries, and long-standing social disparities go back throughout the history of the U.S. Any group seen as different from the dominant group in this country has often been seen as a threat and discriminated against. This was made more evident during the pandemic, which can be seen both from health outcomes and the social unrest arising from blatant systemic racism. …

Still Rooting for Everybody Black

When asked who she was rooting for at the 2017 Emmys, writer, producer, actress, and fellow awkward black girl, Issa Rae replied with, “I’m rooting for everybody black.” Since then, the now iconic phrase has been headlined, memed, lyricized, printed on t-shirts, you name it.

In any award show season, it’s hard not to remember the words of Issa Rae. The Golden Globes are no different. But for an award show infamously known for its collusion, it’s getting hard to root for everybody black when hardly anyone is black. And while this may seem insignificant to some, as if but another notch on the bedpost of weirdo white supremacists, it once again illuminates the lack of, specifically, racial diversity cast on award shows, television, entertainment and art in general–especially the business side of it.…

Black Futures

By Erin Pace

Black History Month is a time of celebration as well as sorrowful remembrance. Growing up in the South, I spent my free time in February reenacting civil rights marches, singing We Shall Overcome, and winning poster contests for my magic marker renderings of Rosa Parks proclaiming ‘I’m not movin’!’. This year, I’m trading my poster for this article in The Oppy and my ancestors would be so proud. Let this article serve as a thank you to the Black business people of times past who paved the way. A few of them include: Alonzo Herndon, who was born in 1858 into slavery but later obtained success through his barbershops and became one of the first African American millionaires in the United States; Madam C.J.…

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